Low FODMAP Ingredient Alternatives

Avoiding foods that are high FODMAP doesn’t mean you can’t ever have your favorite meals again. It just means choosing delicious, low FODMAP alternatives – of which there are hundreds! Here are a few of our favorite low FODMAP swaps:

Honey vs. Maple Syrup

Honey vs. Maple Syrup

In recipes that call for honey - which is high FODMAP at over 1/2 tsp per person – choose maple syrup. To be certain it's low FODMAP, opt for 100% pure maple syrup.

Wheat Bread vs. Sourdough Bread

Wheat Bread vs. Sourdough Bread

To keep tummy trouble at bay, avoid wheat-based bread, which contains high amounts of fructans (one of the FODMAPs). Choose fresh-baked sourdough bread instead. Not only is it more nutritious, but if well made, is low FODMAP, since there is a fermentation step involved in the process of making sourdough bread that actually decreases the fructan content significantly! Although sourdough bread can be found at the supermarket, buying it from a local bakery that is crafting their breads onsite with the utmost care is the best way to ensure that a slow fermentation process has occurred.

Standard Broth vs. Low FODMAP Broth

Standard Broth vs. Low FODMAP Broth

Many store-bought stocks and broths contain garlic or onion, making homemade broth a great low FODMAP option. No time to make your own broth? Gourmend’s Organic Chicken Broth is made with organic free-range chicken bones and gentle green leeks and scallion tops.

Wheat Pasta vs. Gluten-Free Pasta

Wheat Pasta vs. Gluten-Free Pasta

Noodles, macaroni, pasta. Whatever you call it, if it’s made from wheat, it contains the FODMAP fructan and should be avoided. Our low FODMAP go-to is gluten-free pasta made with simple ingredients like rice, corn or quinoa.

Onion vs. Green Scallion Tops

Onion vs. Green Scallion Tops

Onion bulbs can be replaced with the green tops of scallions (or chives). For recipes that call for onion powder, try substituting our Green Onion Powder. Each bottle is made from 2 pounds of organic negi scallion tops, grown in New York and dried within hours of picking.

Peaches vs. Pineapple

Peaches vs. Pineapple

It doesn’t matter if they’re clingstone, white, yellow or canned, peaches are high FODMAP. Don’t worry, a serving size of 1 cup of fresh pineapple is a low FODMAP swap that’s just as sweet and juicy.

Asparagus vs. Green Beans

Asparagus vs. Green Beans

When we need a side of veggies, low FODMAP green beans win! A serving size of up to 15 green beans is low FODMAP, while the excess fructose and fructans in asparagus make it high FODMAP. Be sure to cook your green beans to reduce lectin levels, as high levels in raw beans can lead to digestive issues.

Garlic vs. Garlic Chives or Leek Tops

Garlic vs. Garlic Chives or Leek Tops

Like onions, garlic contains some of the most concentrated sources of FODMAPs. This includes fresh garlic, garlic powder and garlic salt. Use a substitute like the green tops of leeks, garlic scapes or garlic chives, which add very similar flavors to your dishes! If it’s a spice that you’re after, our garlic scape powder and garlic chive powder are safe and savory bets!

Milk vs. Almond Milk

Milk vs. Almond Milk

Does milk do a body good? Not if you’re on the low FODMAP diet! Lactose is a simple sugar found in milk and some other dairy products that is poorly absorbed by the gut. Many of us can’t tolerate lactose. Fortunately, there are plenty of low FODMAP milk alternatives that you can enjoy, including almond, soy and rice milk too!

Mushrooms vs. Roasted Eggplant

Mushrooms vs. Roasted Eggplant

If you’re sensitive to mannitol, hold the mushrooms (with the exception of awesome oyster mushrooms, which are low FODMAP and gut friendly). Instead, enjoy roasted, low FODMAP eggplant. It will absorb the flavor of whatever it's cooked with, so roast it with some paprika or cumin. Or keep it simple, roasting eggplant with olive oil and a dash of salt, and adding it to pizza!

Apples vs. (Not Too Ripe) Bananas

Apples vs. (Not Too Ripe) Bananas

An apple a day … may be really hard on your stomach. That’s because your body may be unable to efficiently break down apples and other food that has more fructose than glucose. If you need a healthy snack, a banana that isn’t too ripe is a good, low FODMAP choice. You can even use mashed banana in recipes that call for apples!

Pistachios vs. Pecans (up to 10)

Pistachios vs. Pecans (up to 10)

It’s time to break up with those high FODMAP pistachios. Even in small serving sizes, pistachios are high FODMAP, so opt for low FODMAP pecans instead. Rich in copper, fiber, thiamine, zinc and other nutrients, a serving size of 10 pecan halves makes a healthy snack. Or try adding them to a salad for some extra crunch!

Yogurt vs. Greek Yogurt

Yogurt vs. Greek Yogurt

Greek yogurt is a smart substitute for traditional yogurt. Traditional yogurt has excess lactose that makes it high FODMAP, while Greek yogurt is the result of straining yogurt after fermentation, removing the watery whey that contains much of the lactose. This process reduces its lactose content to 5–8 grams per 6 ounce serving, making for a more pleasant, low FODMAP digestive experience.


As you can see, you really can turn family favorites into healthy, low FODMAP meals by learning how to make a few easy substitutions. We hope these swaps help you make low FODMAP cooking more flavorful!

Check out our Low FODMAP 101 Guide for more helpful info, tips and inspiration for low FODMAP cooking and living.